Contact Law blog

Editorial

Google begins implementation of the ‘right to be forgotten’ on its search engine

Google has launched a web-form allowing EU citizens to request that their details be removed from search results. This is pursuant to the ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling by the European Court of Justice on 13th May 2014.

The ECJ has decided that search engines are classified as ‘data controllers’ under EU data protection law. This means that they have to comply with the requirement to remove data that is “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant”.

Google’s attempts to implement a judgement many considered unenforceable will attract considerable interest.

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The ramifications of the Government’s criminal legal aid cuts exposed by Cameron’s brother

A serious fraud trial has today (01 May 2014) been halted due to the judge deciding that there was no prospect of a fair trial.

The reasoning is that the defendants will not be adequately represented because no barristers agreed to take on the case.

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Early conciliation for employment disputes is being made a legal requirement on 6 May 2014, but what exactly is it?

There have been a lot of changes made to employment law recently, mainly with the aim of improving efficiency, reducing the number of spurious cases and ultimately saving the government money.

The latest is the introduction of Early Conciliation, a new requirement that must take place before any claim is made to the employment tribunal.

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Prince Charles’ letters: a political and legal drama

The recent (March 2014) saga of Prince Charles’ letters to the UK Government is intriguing from a political perspective, and throws up issues going to the heart of UK constitutional law.

Why is it so important to know what Prince Charles has been writing?

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Could no-win, no-fee agreements be on their way out?

Concerns are mounting over no-win, no-fee agreements after a Legal Ombudsman’s report in late January 2014 highlighted abusive practices by some solicitors.

In 2013 lawyers were ordered to pay nearly £1 million in compensation to clients after agreements went wrong.

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Are whistleblowers protected enough?

Whistleblowing is a situation in which someone reports wrongdoing at their workplace. This could relate to things like law-breaking, environmental damage, health and safety concerns, or dishonesty.

It is widely recognised to be in the public interest for workers to be able to make disclosures of this nature. However, recent reports suggest that not enough is being done to protect and encourage whistleblowers, especially in the teaching profession.

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Are Free Schools regulated sufficiently?

A recent development

The Information Tribunal has rejected an attempt by the Department for Education (DfE) to withhold information, concerning the identity of groups who have proposed to open so-called ‘free schools’ in England, as reported by BBC News.

The Information, including the names, location and religious affiliation of such groups, was requested in an attempt to highlight an alleged lack of transparency inherent in the system of proposing and setting up a free school.

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What is the status of sharia law in the UK?

A recent news story about the exercise of criminal law in Saudi Arabia has generated widespread consternation in the UK. This reaction may, in part, reflect unease about the influence of Muslim rulings in this country, given the recent debate on the Arbitration and Mediation Services (Equality) Bill in the House of Lords, led by Baroness Cox.

The incident was reported by the Daily Mail and concerns the beheading by sword of a Sri Lankan national, Rizana Nafeek, despite claims that she was only 17 years old in 2005 when the alleged crime was committed. Nafeek was executed this Wednesday for causing the death of a four-month-old baby in her care, while working as a housemaid in Saudi Arabia.

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Government to re-visit perennial problem of care costs for the elderly?

Norman Lamb, the Coalition Health Minister, has called for the issue of how to fund care for the elderly to be addressed urgently by the Government. In an interview with the Daily Mail this week, Lamb said that legislation must be brought in to address the principal of capping care costs.

The cap was a key recommendation of the Government-appointed Dilnot Commission, charged with making recommendations on how long-term care for the elderly should be funded in the future. The report, published in July this year, advised that the cap, after which the state would fund care, should be set at between £25,000 and £50,000, with £35,000 as the most reasonable figure.

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Landmark ruling on equal pay case could generate wave of new claims

This Wednesday, at the Supreme Court in London, five senior judges ruled on a case concerning whether equal pay claims could be made in the civil court rather than being confined to Employment Tribunals, as reported by the BBC.

The ruling, which follows those made previously by the High Court and the Court of Appeal on the matter, also has implications regarding the time-limit in which ex-employees can launch such claims.

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Editorial Image

In this section you will find opinionated pieces about topical issues. They are usually based around a news item, with opinions aimed at promoting discussion.

The views in these posts are those of the individual author, and not necessarily of Contact Law.

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